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History’s Arch

Edmonton celebrates its river roots with a new bridge at the site of the city’s founding

Edmonton, Alberta

Bridge history

Walterdale Bridge is named after early settler John Walter, who operated a ferry at this crossing over the North Saskatchewan River before a bridge was built. The new Walterdale Bridge replaces the old structure built in 1912-13.

The archway

The new 230m bridge span features a signature arch structure (over 50m tall) serving as a gateway to the downtown core. The bridge allows for both a greater flow of vehicle and pedestrian traffic across the stunning North Saskatchewan River.

Passerelle designed for people

Pedestrians and cyclists have a pleasant experience crossing the river, separated from traffic on the east side of the bridge. The wide passerelle includes seating that shelters people from prevailing winds and provides a chance to get close to the North Saskatchewan River.

The parkway

Pedestrian routes offer excellent accessibility and connectivity to the river valley’s extensive trail system. These newly created passageways resulting from the bridge’s arch design also accommodate seating for taking in the signature views of both the city and river valley.

Functional and beautiful

As a prominent addition to the Edmonton skyline, the bridge is designed to be both functional and beautiful. The signature steel arches and cable design hides utility pipes and cables, which have been relocated from the old Walterdale Bridge. At night, the bridge is equally stunning as the crisp white arches continue to mark it as a distinct feature of Edmonton.

Project facts

Completed: 2017
Collaborators: Buckland & Taylor, ISL, Alterra
Client: City of Edmonton